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Skyfall Residence
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All content copyright Turnbull Griffin Haesloop Architects | Site Design
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Skyfall has a unique setting at the Sea Ranch in that it is bordered by golf links on both sides of the lots located on the cul de sac. A large stand of Cypress trees anchors the southern edge of the site. To the west broad views sweep across the fairways to the Pacific and Bluff houses and to the north to the stands of trees along the Gualala River.

Our response was to look for simple barn like forms that spoke to the owner's program and would nestle against the cypress stand to create a protected courtyard from the golf course and wind. Entering the compound, the entry gate and space between the two buildings is aligned to focus across the fairway to Pacific between the bluff front houses. The courtyard functions as the center of the house and is anchored by the hot tub and fence along the eastern side and a fire pit adjacent to the living room.

The study / living / kitchen / dining area is under the long gable roof with windows that stretch along the length of the space following the sweep of the fairway. A protected window seat enclosure punctuates the fenestration and creates a space within the larger space across from the kitchen island. The guest room tower forms the north side of the courtyard (with solar collectors set below the edge of the wall) and the separate master bedroom edges the southern side. The owners requested exploring materials that would require minimal maintenance and age well. We settled on cement panels with the use of wood in areas that were closer at hand such as the windows and entry porch areas. The Equitone cement panels clad both the walls and roof to minimize the separation of wall and roof similar to the earlier wooden barns and early Sea Ranch use of wood for walls and roofs. The panels have a ribbed texture to soften the material and settle the forms in the landscape. Structural wood fins are pulled down in between the windows, much like exposed barn framing.
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